<b>Different Variable and Recent Development in Noval Buccal Drug Delivery System</b> The buccal region of the oral cavity is an attractive target for administration of the drug of choice, particularly in overcoming deficiencies associated with the latter mode of administration. Problems such as high first pass metabolism and drug degradation in the gastrointestinal environment can be circumvented by administering the drug via the buccal route. Moreover, rapid onset of action can be achieved relative to the oral route and the formulation can be removed if therapy is required to be discontinued. It is also possible to administer drugs to patients who unconscious and less co operative. To prevent accidental swallowing of drugs adhesive mucosal dosage forms were suggested for oral delivery, which included adhesive tablets, adhesive gels, adhesive patches and many other dosage forms with various combinations of polymers, absorption enhancers. Natural polymers have recently gained importance in pharmaceutical field. Mucoadhesive polymers are used to improve drug delivery by enhancing the dosage form’s contact time and residence time with the mucous membranes. Mucoadhesion may be defined as the process where polymers attach to biological substrate or a synthetic or natural macromolecule, to mucus or an epithelial surface. When the biological substrate is attached to a mucosal layer then this phenomenon is known as mucoadhesion. The substrate possessing bioadhesive polymer can help in drug delivery for a prolonged period of time at a specific delivery site. The studies of Mucoadhesive polymers provide a good approach of mucoadhesion and some factors which have the ability to affect the mucoadhesive properties of a polymer. Both natural and synthetic polymers are used for the preparation of mucoadhesive buccal patches. In addition to this, studies have been conducted on the development of controlled or slow release delivery systems for systemic and local therapy of diseases in the oral cavity. Bioadhesion, Barriers, Pathway, Transmucosal Dosage Form, first pass effect 345-351 Issue-5 Volume-3 Deepak Chandra Sharma | Pranshu Tangri | Sunil Jawla | Ravinesh Mishra