<b>Mechanical Low Backache</b> Back pain is one of the most common patient complaints brought forth to physicians. Mechanical back pain accounts for 97 of cases, arising from spinal structures such as bone, ligaments, discs, joints, nerves, and meninges. Acute back pain in the absence of progressive neurologic deficits and other underlying non mechanical causes may be treated conservatively, with specific emphasis on maintaining activity levels and function. Mechanical back pain persisting for more than 4 to 6 weeks may warrant further diagnostic testing and imaging. Common causes of mechanical back pain include spinal stenosis, herniated discs, zygapophysial joint pain, discogenic pain, vertebral fractures, sacroiliac joint pain, and myofascial pain. A wide variety of treatments are available, with different treatments specifically targeted toward different causes. A balanced approach, which takes into account patient psychosocial factors and incorporates multidisciplinary care, increases the likelihood of success from back pain interventions. The majority of people will experience mechanical low back pain sometime in their lives. Mechanical low back pain can be defined as pain resulting from excessive or prolonged posture issues, such as too much sitting or standing. Pain can also be caused from overuse or muscle strain, or it could be pain secondary to injury or deformity relating to the spinal structures, such as bone, ligaments, discs, joints, nerves, and meninges. Mechanical back pain persisting for more than 4 to 6 weeks may require diagnostic testing and imaging. Nonetheless, treatments are available, including physical therapy, with different programs specifically targeted toward different causes. mechanical LBA, Physiotherapy, posture 1612-1623 Issue-6 Volume-2 Dr. Madhuri Paikera | Laxmi Barve | Subhra Dubey